Sit – Stay – Relax Lesson Discussion

  • Lbp

    Member
    February 8, 2021 at 12:33 PM

    That was really interesting! We’re so glad we found your videos, Robert!

    Three members of the family, watching enthralled. The cat has been hiding upstairs since the pup came home

  • oldSAP-Charlie

    Member
    February 8, 2021 at 8:47 PM

    great idea.

  • Lbp

    Member
    February 8, 2021 at 10:58 PM

    I tried this with her this morning and saw a change in sit behaviour very quickly. I look forward to building up how long she’ll do it for (currently 16weeks old)

  • Robert

    Member
    March 31, 2021 at 2:28 PM

    Could I practice this exercise but with a prong collar instead of the martingale?

  • Adam

    Member
    June 3, 2021 at 5:15 AM

    Hi There

    Have watched a few of Roberts STAY videos, and haven’t heard him use the actual command ‘STAY’

    Does he suggest making the dog ‘sit’ and break for the stay, as opposed to actually using a STAY command?

    Thanks

    Adam

    • Riggan

      Member
      June 3, 2021 at 8:26 AM

      Adam,

      Yes, Robert uses the approach that the Stay is implied in the Sit (or Down or Stand or any static command). He does not use a separate Stay command.

      • Adam

        Member
        June 4, 2021 at 3:32 AM

        Thanks for clarifying Riggan

  • Kelley

    Member
    June 29, 2021 at 12:42 PM

    I just finished watching the Sit, Stay, Relax video and I am wondering how I can keep my pup (8 month Labrador) from chewing and playing with the leash when I apply a gentle pull? Also, I have a prong collar, is that ok to use?

  • Fiona

    Member
    February 13, 2022 at 6:38 AM

    like the video, newbie here, got a question:

    I lured my puppy into sit, then marked it with ‘yes’ or a click before treat, now he knows the command ‘sit’, I will not say ‘yes’ until I want to release him, is this correct? do i have to change ‘yes’ to ‘ok’ or ‘free’?

    Is this the general rule that you use word ‘yes’ immediately when puppy did something you are expecting during learning, and once he learned you will not say ‘yes’ any more if he did as commanded and just say ‘yes’ to release him from that command? thanks

  • Ed (RoninDog)

    Member
    February 13, 2022 at 6:47 AM

    Correct. Yes is a reward word and a release word all combined. Free or break are just release words. Young pups will not have the ability to hold a position. So you kind of release them immediately. His butt hits the ground and we go “yes” + treat. Fun fun fun

  • Ed (RoninDog)

    Member
    February 13, 2022 at 6:50 AM

    Correct. Yes is a reward word and a release word all combined. Free or break are just release words. Young pups will not have the ability to hold a position. So you kind of release them immediately. His butt hits the ground and we go “yes” + treat. Fun fun fun

    BTW, you use “yes” for the entire life of the dog. You just hold off and introduce the “good” bridge word (keep doing what you are doing) and then “Yes” at the end to reward + release.

    • Fiona

      Member
      February 13, 2022 at 3:11 PM

      Thanks, so the bridge word ‘good’ before ‘yes’, I have not yet introduced the ‘free’ into my puppy, watching Robert’s sit/stay/relax video and puppy series with Max, looks like ‘yes’ as release/reward is enough?

  • Ed (RoninDog)

    Member
    February 13, 2022 at 4:23 PM

    Not quite a sequence, but more like language… “yes” is “you did a good job congrats”, “good” is “that is great keep doing what you are doing”, “free” or “break” is “hey bubba, you are free to do whatever you want”. So you kind of use them as it makes sense. When you say “you did a good job congrats” it is implied that the job is over. When you say “that is great keep doing what you are doing” it is implied that the job is not done, yet and the dog is not released. And so forth. Hope it makes sense.

    • Fiona

      Member
      February 14, 2022 at 5:24 PM

      In the ‘sit’ situation, puppy sits after the verbal command, now we have two options, ‘yes’ or ‘free’, looks like we should use ‘free’, right? if we still use both in different situations, puppy need to understand the difference, might be difficult.

Page 1 of 2